IN REMEMBRANCE OF

Michael I. Rothburd, PhD
aka - "bman"


1941 - 2018

It is with great sadness that we report on the passing of BSF's founding member and first President, Dr. Michael Rothburd. Mike left us on December 5, 2018 after an extended illness. He received his Ph.D. in Psychology from Ohio University and following graduation moved his family to Tampa in 1970. Mike served as a professor at the University of Tampa, ran a Hillsborough County clinic, and established a private clinical psychology and biofeedback practice that served his patients for over 45 years.

Mike will be remembered for his expansive intellect, esoteric humor, passion for jazz, and running commentary from the back of the room at BSF workshops. In true form, he sent this advice to those attending the recent BSF 40th anniversary dinner: "Maintain optimal impedance and never ever take a personal check." He will be greatly missed.

A Memorial Service for Mike was held Sunday, December 9 at his temple, Congregation Schaarai Zedek. In lieu of flowers, donations are encouraged to Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa. Condolences may be expressed online at segalfuneralhome.com.



UPCOMING EVENTS

BCIA CLINICAL UPDATE SERIES

January 17, 2019
Strategies to Increase the Effectiveness of HRV Biofeedback

Presented by
Fred Shaffer, PhD, BCB,
BCB-HRV


This webinar presented by popular teacher and HRV expert, Dr. Fred Shaffer is the first scheduled in the BCIA 2019 Clinical Update Series. Mark your calendars and watch here for more information.

Visit www.BCIA.org for more information about this and other BCIA CE programs.


What is Biofeedback?

Biofeedback is a process that enables an individual to learn how to change physiological activity for the purposes of improving health and performance. Precise instruments are used to measure physiological activity such as brainwaves, heart function, breathing, muscle activity, and skin temperature. These instruments rapidly and accurately "feed back" information to the user, typically on a computer display. The presentation of this information - often in conjunction with changes in thinking, emotions, and behavior - supports desired physiological changes. Over time, these changes can endure without continued use of an instrument.

One example of biofeedback would be the application of surface EMG (electromyography or muscle activity) in rehabilitation. A stroke victim might have minimal motor control in a partially paralyzed limb, and through EMG biofeedback, would view a representation of their muscle activity on a computer screen. Sensors placed on the skin above the musculature would allow the instrument to show minute changes in muscle activity, so small that the individual might not be aware of them, as she/he attempts to move the limb. With that information now immediately available to them, the person can see if their efforts are working, and over time, learn to recruit the neural activity and muscle activation necessary to improve function.

There are numerous other biofeedback modalities that are identified by the physiological process that is the target of change (i.e., EEG or brainwave activity, also called neurofeedback, thermography, a measure of skin temperature that represents blood flow, and HRV or heart rate variability, to name a few).

Biofeedback has been shown to be useful in treating the following:
  • Migraine headaches
  • Tension headaches
  • Other types of chronic pain
  • Disorders of the digestive system
  • Incontinence
  • High blood pressure
  • Cardiac arrhythmias (abnormalities in the rhythm of the heartbeat)
  • ADD/ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder)
  • Epilepsy
  • Paralysis, spinal cord injury and other movement disorders
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Raynaud's Disease
  • Stroke
  • Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD)
  • Insomnia
  • Asthma
Biofeedback is also used to improve academic and athletic performance, and its technology is being utilized in the emerging science of brain-computer interface and the development of applications in video/computer gaming.

For more information about Biofeedback, visit the Association for Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback website.